Top Cryptocurrency Ponzi Scams as of 2020 Cryptotapas

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to conspiracy [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Money [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to economy [link] [comments]

The Truth about Bitcoin?

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to investing_discussion [link] [comments]

Bitcoin and Meritocratic Capitalism

Part 1/4 - NSA Connection:
First off, the SHA-256 algorithm, which stands for Secure Hash Algorithm 256, is a member of the SHA-2 cryptographic hash functions designed by the NSA and first published in 2001.
SHA-256, like other hash functions, takes any input and produces an output (often called a hash) of fixed length. The output of a hashing algorithm such as SHA-256 will always be the same length - regardless of the input size. Specifically, the output is, as the name suggests, 256 bits.
Moreover, all outputs appear completely random and offer no information about the input that created it.
The Bitcoin Network utilises the SHA-256 algorithm for mining and the creation of new addresses.
Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? What does Satoshi Nakamoto mean?
Out of respect for their anonymity, it would be rude to speculate in a video about who Satoshi Nakamoto is likely to be. The reality is, it's not important. Let me explain: Any human being can be attacked. Jesus could come back from the dead, and there would be haters. Therefore, the Satoshi Nakamoto approach neutralises the natural human herd behaviour, exacerbated by the media, to attack and discredit. This is a very important part of Bitcoin's success thus far. Also, from a security perspective, those who wish to dox Satoshi Nakamoto in a video are essentially putting his, or her, or their, life at risk...for the sake of views.
As a genius who has produced an innovation not just from a technical perspective but also a monetary perspective, they should be treated with more respect than that.
As for the name Satoshi Nakamoto, I would speculate that it is a homage to Tatsuaki Okamoto and Satoshi Obana - two cryptographers from Japan. There is another reason for the name, but that...is confidential.
In 1996, the NSA's Cryptology Division of their Office of Information Security Research and Technology published a paper titled: "How to make a mint: The cryptography of anonymous electronic cash", first publishing it in an MIT mailing list and later, in 1997, in the American University Law Review. One of the researchers they referenced was Tatsuaki Okamoto.

Part 2/4 - 'Crypto Market':
Most of the crypto market is a scam.
By the way, this was predicted very early on in the Bitcoin Talk forums - check out this interaction from November 8th, 2010:
"if bitcoin really takes off I can see lots of get-rich-quick imitators coming on the scene: gitcoin, nitcoin, witcoin, titcoin, shitcoin...
Of course the cheap imitators will disappear as quickly as those 1990s "internet currencies", but lots of people will get burned along the way."
To which Bitcoin OG Gavin Andresen replies:
"I agree - we're in the Wild West days of open-source currency. I expect people will get burned by scams, imitators, ponzi schemes and price bubbles."
"I don't think there's a whole lot that can be done about scammers, imitators and ponzi schemes besides warning people to be careful with their money (whether dollars, euros or bitcoins)."
Now, on the one hand, lack of regulation is more meritocratic (as you don't have to be an accredited investor just to get access).
On the other hand, it means that crypto is, as Gavin said, a Wild West environment, with many cowboys in the Desert. Be careful.
This is the same with most online courses - particularly 'How to get rich quick' courses - however with crypto you have an exponential increase in the supply of victims during the bull cycles so it is particularly prevalent during those times.
In addition to this, leverage trading exchanges, which are no different to casinos, prey on naive retail traders who:
A) Think they can outsmart professional traders with actual risk management skills; and
B) Think they can outsmart the exchanges themselves who have an informational advantage as well as an incentive to chase stop losses and liquidate positions.

Part 3/4 - CBDCs:
The Fed and Central Banks around the world have printed themselves into a corner.
Quantitative easing was the band-aid for the Great Financial Crisis in 2008, and more recent events have propelled the rate of money printing to absurd levels.
This means that all currencies are in a race to zero - and it becomes a game of who can print more fiat faster.
The powers that be know that this fiat frenzy is unsustainable, and that more and more people are becoming aware that it is a debt based system, based on nothing.
The monetary system devised by bankers, for bankers, in 1913 on Jekyll Island and supercharged in 1971 is fairly archaic and also does not allow for meritocratic value transfer - fiat printing itself increases inequality.
They, obviously, know this (as it is by design).
The issue (for them) is that more and more people are starting to become aware of this.
Moving to a modernised monetary system will allow those who have rigged the rules of the game for the last Century to get away scot-free.
It will also pave the way for a new wealthy, and more tech literate, elite to emerge - again predicted in the Bitcoin Talk forums.
Now...back to the powers that be.
Bitcoin provides a natural transition to Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDCs) and what I would describe as Finance 2.0, but what are the benefits of CBDCs for the state?
More control, easier tax collection, more flexibility in monetary policy (i.e. negative interest rates) and generally a more efficient monetary system.
This leads us to the kicker: which is the war on cash. The cashless society was a fantasy just a few years ago, however now it doesn't seem so far fetched. No comment.

Part 4/4 - Bitcoin:
What about Bitcoin?
Well, Bitcoin has incredibly strong network effects; it is the most powerful computer network in the World.
But what about Bitcoin's reputation?
Bankers hate it.
Warren Buffett hates it.
Precisely, and the public hates bankers.
Sure, the investing public respects Buffett, but the general public perception of anyone worth $73 billion is not exactly at all time highs right now amid record wealth inequality.
In the grand scheme of things, the market cap of Bitcoin is currently around $179 billion.
For example, the market cap of Gold is around $9 trillion, which is 50x the Market Cap of Bitcoin.
Money has certain characteristics.
In my opinion, what makes Bitcoin unique is the fact that it has a finite total supply (21 million) and a predictable supply schedule via the halving events every 4 years, which cut in half the rate at which new Bitcoin is released into circulation.
Clearly, with these properties, it seems likely that Bitcoin could act as a meaningful hedge against inflation.
One of the key strengths of Bitcoin is the fact that the Network is decentralised...
Many people don't know that PayPal originally wanted to create a global currency similar to crypto.
Overall, a speculative thesis would be the following:
Satoshi Nakamoto is one of the most important entities of the 21st Century, and will accelerate the next transition of the human race.
Trusted third parties are security holes.
Bitcoin is the catalyst for Finance 2.0, whereby value transfer is conducted in a more meritocratic and decentralised fashion.
In 1964, Russian astrophysicist Nikolai Kardashev designed the Kardashev Scale.
At the time, he was looking for signs of extraterrestrial life within cosmic signals.
The Scale has three categories, which are based on the amount of usable energy a civilisation has at its disposal, and the degree of space colonisation.
Generally, a Type 1 Civilisation has achieved mastery of its home planet (10^16W);
A Type 2 Civilisation has mastery over its solar system (10^26W);
and a Type 3 Civilisation has mastery over its Galaxy (10^36W).
We humans are a Type 0 Civilisation on this Scale.
Nonetheless, our exponential technological growth in the few decades indicates that we are somewhere between Type 0 and Type 1.
In fact, according to Carl Sagan's interpolated Kardashev Scale and recent global energy consumption, we are about 0.73.
Physicist Freeman Dyson estimated that within 200 years or so, we should attain Type 1 status.
As a technology that, through its decentralisation, links entities globally and makes value transfer between humans more efficient, Bitcoin could prove a key piece of our progression as a civilisation.
What are your thoughts?
Is it true...or false?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oQLOqpP1ZM
submitted by financeoptimum to Capitalism [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - June 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 30th monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in May 2019
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Research
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A solution for peak social media - The Omeganet distributed database protocol

I have found a solution that solves social media. The idea is to use a shareable database with atomic additions secured by proof of work. It is similar to bitcoin but is not a ponzi scheme. There are no coins. There is no way to invest. I cannot ask for money. There is no singular version of the database that all participants must agree on. Whatever part of the database you've personally collected is what you will use to rank topics.
The database tracks ever shifting ownership of participants who have made additions to the database. Each addition requires some amount of computation time. There are many networks, each with a different security requirement and thus different amount of computation time required to make additions to it. Higher security networks will have less data traffic. Lower security networks will have more traffic. You will connect to the network that has the 'just right' amount of traffic, enough to not tax your computer and network resources.
When voting on a topic a user will place a weight (like 10) on a target. When voting again, another weight (-5) is placed, and another (15). The user's accumulated voting power is then distributed among the all their placed weights. A user can place as many weights as they wants but their voting power is cut down by total amount of weight they've placed. To vote on everything is to vote on nothing.
Acquiring voting power is done by expending resources and making additions to the database. As time progresses, voting power is lost by exponential decay. In other words, if old users do not continuously expend computing resources to maintain their voting power, it is lost. Voting power is thus distributed proportionally to users based on their expense into continuously updating the database.
If you want to read more, here's a document that fills in most every question you could possibly have. It takes about 2-4 hours to read. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1DJsIFCIFpRrWrl1GvbhkYlzU7JRJqwinUIsPQSJjtQI/edit
submitted by Ghudda to realsolutions [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: CryptoCurrency top posts from 2017-06-16 to 2020-03-29 14:02 PDT

Period: 1017.08 days
Submissions Comments
Total 934 259273
Rate (per day) 0.92 254.49
Unique Redditors 752 54249
Combined Score 2439059 2983723

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 55770 points, 8 submissions: DestroyerOfShitcoins
    1. CryptoNick is deleting all of his BitConnect videos, and so are his buddies. Please never forget what he and his cohorts did to so many people, and how much money those people lost in the process thanks to CryptoNick, Trevon James, and Craig Grant! (26497 points, 3056 comments)
    2. Listen up folks, if you "did", or still do promote cryptocurrency related scams, you will be called out on it via this sub-Reddit. We don't care about you, or your ill-gotten gains, we care about the general well-being of our community first and foremost. (17888 points, 1277 comments)
    3. So no one else finds it a bit odd that Verge is actually going up in price in a bear market, after a hack attack, after being outed for paying McAfee to promote it, and after the 1 developer begged for money from his own community to allegedly help pay his taxes? (2548 points, 867 comments)
    4. Not 2 days after the fall of BitConnect, and Trevon James is already promoting his next Ponzi scheme affiliate program in his latest video called Davor... the nerve of this guy! (2230 points, 412 comments)
    5. Cryptonick is selling a cryptocurrency course for $497, and yet he doesn't even know the difference between a public key and a private key... welcome to crypto folks! (1803 points, 238 comments)
    6. You guys have to stop expecting any of these business men of old to champion "decentralized" cryptocurrencies... it's just not going to happen. (1790 points, 449 comments)
    7. The bulls are back baby, and Ethereum is taking over the pairing business on exchanges... it's about time! (1642 points, 733 comments)
    8. Trevon James, legendary BitConnect scammer gets caught trying to cheat on Steemit, by up-voting shit on a fake account to make money... has this guy ever done anything honest in his entire life? (1372 points, 192 comments)
  2. 47580 points, 13 submissions: coinmoon_com
    1. Nasdaq is open to becoming cryptocurrency exchange, CEO says (17168 points, 830 comments)
    2. Facebook bans crypto advertising. Then says it’s working on its own crypto coin. Hypocrites! (6036 points, 335 comments)
    3. JUSTICE: Bitconnect Leader Arrested (4283 points, 315 comments)
    4. Apparently there is no SEC hearing on Ethereum today and it is all just orchestrated FUD. (2863 points, 437 comments)
    5. Nasdaq May Launch Bitcoin Trading in October 2018 (2650 points, 182 comments)
    6. UPbit audit confirms South Korea’s biggest Cryptocurrency Exchange was not at fault. It was all just FUD! (2328 points, 110 comments)
    7. LET THIS SINK IN: "Bitcoin has the potential to become the first worldwide currency and we're trying to make that happen" - NYSE Owner (2224 points, 587 comments)
    8. Coinbase Survey Shows 18% of all US Students Now Own Cryptocurrency (1793 points, 331 comments)
    9. Beyond Huge! With $10.7 trillion worth of assets under custody and administration, Northern Trust opens doors to Cryptocurrency hedge funds (1770 points, 143 comments)
    10. CNN Video: "People around the world are starting to trust Bitcoin more than the Central Banks". Damn Right! (1679 points, 434 comments)
  3. 44336 points, 8 submissions: arsonbunny
    1. Why we won't have a long term bear market, and how to systematically pick your future investments in crypto (14599 points, 917 comments)
    2. I've created an Excel Crypto Portfolio Tracker that draws live prices and coin data from CoinMarketCap.com. Here is how to create your own. (12287 points, 687 comments)
    3. Want to start fresh after the crypto crash? Here is a comprehensive guide on how to invest and prosper over the long term. (6087 points, 636 comments)
    4. This sub is a mess and needs to get out of the anger stage: How to move forward from the crash if you're a bagholder (3356 points, 392 comments)
    5. Understanding Tether: Why it accounts for a substantial part of the crypto market cap and why its the #1 outstanding issue in crypto markets today (2703 points, 709 comments)
    6. How and why exchanges are manipulating the price in order to capitalize on the new market dynamics (2361 points, 491 comments)
    7. I built these 3 fundamental valuation models for Bitcoin in Excel. Details in the comment. (1507 points, 109 comments)
    8. Understanding Bitcoin Futures: How they work and why they are NOT going to crash the crypto market (1436 points, 122 comments)
  4. 25819 points, 15 submissions: Kashpantz
    1. When you are a known scammer in the crypto space and get called out by one of your investors. Exciting times indeed. (2568 points, 237 comments)
    2. The Gloves Are Off. Ripple laying into J.P Morgan As They Enter The Crypto Space. (2091 points, 555 comments)
    3. The Scam That Is Volitility & Fees (2077 points, 322 comments)
    4. Crypto Explained By The Simpsons (2005 points, 134 comments)
    5. When Investingin In The Stocks Seems Crazy. (1983 points, 284 comments)
    6. Pretty much this sums it up for crypto and politics. (1831 points, 118 comments)
    7. Don't look at ATHs, the story starts when you look at ATLs. (1783 points, 223 comments)
    8. When things go bad in Argentina... Use Crypto (1782 points, 195 comments)
    9. Is this unjust? Where a bank can shut you down for investing in the cannabis industry even if it's legal in your country or state? A perfect use case for crypto where it is borderless and censorship resistant. No longer the banks are the gatekeepers of our own money. (1658 points, 280 comments)
    10. Some Simple Tips to Avoid Traps in the Crypto Sphere. (1558 points, 251 comments)
  5. 20147 points, 1 submission: Suuperdad
    1. I will tell you exactly what is going on here, this is critical information to understand if you are going to make money in this space. How prices work, and what moves them - and it's not money invested/withdrawn. (20147 points, 1442 comments)
  6. 19965 points, 1 submission: Gabriel-Lewis
    1. Robinhood is launching a Crypto Trading app to compete with Coinbase (19965 points, 3895 comments)
  7. 19632 points, 1 submission: sash187
    1. Checkmate, Bill. (19632 points, 1097 comments)
  8. 18484 points, 1 submission: x2P
    1. Delta's app store description seems appropriate today. (18484 points, 317 comments)
  9. 17374 points, 4 submissions: Rupispupis
    1. When you're holding altcoins but your friends only heard of Bitcoin and all congratulate you because they think you had an incredible day (12352 points, 587 comments)
    2. It'd be sad if it wasn't funny (2174 points, 108 comments)
    3. Brave uncovers widespread surveillance of UK citizens by private companies embedded on UK council websites (1625 points, 80 comments)
    4. Ask, and ye shall receive (1223 points, 93 comments)
  10. 17265 points, 2 submissions: mtimetraveller
    1. The true power of Bitcoin 🔥 (14638 points, 1274 comments)
    2. Microsoft Excel recognizes Bitcoin as a currency (2627 points, 163 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. arsonbunny (13668 points, 114 comments)
  2. martinkarolev (5448 points, 48 comments)
  3. hanzyfranzy (5299 points, 6 comments)
  4. Toyake (5151 points, 254 comments)
  5. Bungwads (5078 points, 1 comment)
  6. throwawayLouisa (4784 points, 408 comments)
  7. Raymikqwer (4768 points, 71 comments)
  8. JohnDalysJohn (4768 points, 2 comments)
  9. Thefriendlyfaceplant (4410 points, 324 comments)
  10. rockyrainy (4306 points, 117 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. CryptoNick is deleting all of his BitConnect videos, and so are his buddies. Please never forget what he and his cohorts did to so many people, and how much money those people lost in the process thanks to CryptoNick, Trevon James, and Craig Grant! by DestroyerOfShitcoins (26497 points, 3056 comments)
  2. I will tell you exactly what is going on here, this is critical information to understand if you are going to make money in this space. How prices work, and what moves them - and it's not money invested/withdrawn. by Suuperdad (20147 points, 1442 comments)
  3. Robinhood is launching a Crypto Trading app to compete with Coinbase by Gabriel-Lewis (19965 points, 3895 comments)
  4. Checkmate, Bill. by sash187 (19632 points, 1097 comments)
  5. Delta's app store description seems appropriate today. by x2P (18484 points, 317 comments)
  6. Listen up folks, if you "did", or still do promote cryptocurrency related scams, you will be called out on it via this sub-Reddit. We don't care about you, or your ill-gotten gains, we care about the general well-being of our community first and foremost. by DestroyerOfShitcoins (17888 points, 1277 comments)
  7. Nasdaq is open to becoming cryptocurrency exchange, CEO says by coinmoon_com (17168 points, 830 comments)
  8. The true power of Bitcoin 🔥 by mtimetraveller (14638 points, 1274 comments)
  9. Why we won't have a long term bear market, and how to systematically pick your future investments in crypto by arsonbunny (14599 points, 917 comments)
  10. Great news from Korea! Banks will allow cryptocurrency trading again from today and next week account registration is opened again. by riverflop (13419 points, 462 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 5078 points: Bungwads's comment in Checkmate, Bill.
  2. 4792 points: hanzyfranzy's comment in Bitcoin breaches $4000 in 15 minutes. What is happening 😳
  3. 3630 points: eNte19's comment in Enjoy the massacre. It could be a once in life opportunity.
  4. 3533 points: sakata_gintoki113's comment in Russian nuclear scientists arrested for trying to use one of Russia's most powerful supercomputers to mine Bitcoins
  5. 3462 points: JohnDalysJohn's comment in CryptoNick is deleting all of his BitConnect videos, and so are his buddies. Please never forget what he and his cohorts did to so many people, and how much money those people lost in the process thanks to CryptoNick, Trevon James, and Craig Grant!
  6. 2988 points: Xgatt's comment in CryptoNick is deleting all of his BitConnect videos, and so are his buddies. Please never forget what he and his cohorts did to so many people, and how much money those people lost in the process thanks to CryptoNick, Trevon James, and Craig Grant!
  7. 2909 points: dankmeter's comment in Coinbase/GDAX Warning - $50,000 Wire DEPOSIT Missing Since December 12th
  8. 2884 points: regecide2025's comment in No one was complaining about "manipulation" when it was going up from 2500 to 20,000 in less than 6 months.
  9. 2854 points: harambissimo's comment in Who would win?
  10. 2781 points: LivingWithWhales's comment in ETH has passed $900 and has retaken the #2 market cap spot from XRP
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - December 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 36th monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you a quick (but not necessarily the best) overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in December 2019
Adoption
Development
Security
Mining
Business
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to deal with a (potentially) fraudulent 1099-K

My client never received a 1099-K (until just a few days ago after a lot of bugging the provider). He got a letter from the IRS a few weeks ago saying that they received one on him to the tune of about $40k. He apparently invested in some bitcoin-type company that turned out to be a Ponzi scheme and he lost basically all of it, so he had no gains.
The 1099 is for the 2017 tax year.
My plan is to help him write a letter to the IRS disputing the 1099, is there anything else I should be doing for him? I’m not an EA yet (or anything equal) so I can’t directly advocate for him with the IRS.
submitted by HMWWaWChChIaWChCChW to taxpros [link] [comments]

100 Reasons to Buy Bitcoin

  1. Bitcoin is the most censorship resistant money in the world.
  2. You don't have to buy a “whole” bitcoin so don't freak out if you look at the price. You can buy a piece of one no problem.
  3. The Dallas Mavericks accept Bitcoin on their website. You don't trust Mark Cuban. He's the best shark.
  4. Bitcoin is the best performing asset of the last decade (better than S&P500).
  5. Diversify your current portfolio.
  6. It's not illegal in the USA.
  7. You holding just one satoshi slightly limits the supply and can rise the price for everyone else.
  8. [In late 2019] hash rate is the highest it has ever been
  9. Suicide insurance; if Bitcoin rises in price there is no worse feeling than regret.
  10. Some of the smartest people in computer science and cryptography are working on it. Trust nerds.
  11. Look at the all time historical chart. No technical analysis just tell me what you think when you look at it.
  12. Money is a belief system... and I want to believe.
  13. Transparent ledger, no funny business going on it's easy to audit.
  14. Elon Musk appears to be a fan. How's that for an appeal to authority
  15. There is a fixed limit in the number of bitcoins that will exist. 21 million bitcoin, 7 billion people on earth. Do the math.
  16. There are so many examples of governments inflating their currency to the point where it becomes unusable. Read the wikipedia page for Venezuela or Zimbabwe.
  17. Altcoins make sacrifices in either security or centralization. There are altcoins out there that claim to be innovating but just check the scoreboard nothing has flipped Bitcoin in market value or even gotten close.
  18. With technology developing at a rate faster than law, governments and for-profit businesses have the ability to monitor our purchases, location, our habits, and all of this has happened without consent. People made jokes and conspiracy theory, but sometimes conspiracy is real. Most people are good, but there is absolutely evil out there. There are absolutely evil people in positions of power. There are absolutely evil people that work together in positions of power. Does anyone actually believe that Jeffrey Epstein committed suicide. Go read about Leslie Wexner. Go read the cypherpunk manifesto.
  19. The upcoming halvening in 2020 will reduce the number of Bitcoin created in each block, making them more scarce, and if history repeats more valuable.
  20. Bitcoin has lower fees than traditional banking.
  21. Gold has the advantage of being a physical thing. But unlike gold you know Bitcoin is not forged, or mixed with another metal, and you can easily break it into tiny pieces and send it over the internet to someone.
  22. Bitcoin could spark new interests maybe you start to read more into economics, computer science, or Brock Pierce.
  23. Bitcoin has survived with no leader, marketing team, public relations, or legal team.
  24. Because Wired magazine said Bitcoin was dead at $2, Forbes said it was dead at $15, NY Times at $208, and CNN at $333.
  25. Just do a cost benefit analysis. What happens if Bitcoin fails and it goes to zero vs. what happens if it succeeds, and becomes world money.
  26. Bitcoin encourages long term thinking, planning, saving. Due to inflation we are punished by holding on to cash. Look up the statistics on the average savings account while we are bombarded with consumerist bullshit like Funko pop heads, Loot crate subscription services, and new syrup flavors for coffee. Currently we are encouraged to spend now, seek immediate gratification, and ignore what we are becoming as Amazon picks out our clothes and toothpaste ships it to the house and we sit and watch streaming services where content is pushed to us and I'm supposed to buy that this garbage is actually “trending”. Our lives have become so comfortable that idiots spend $60 to escape a room and have someone take your picture when you get out. What would our ancestors think.
  27. Maybe you're a day trader looking to use a trading bot in an unregulated market.
  28. Bitcoin has 7 letters in it. Lucky number 7.....
  29. Bitcoin promises to bank the unbanked, and provide services to those not otherwise “qualified” to open a bank account.
  30. It's just cool, don't you want to seem smart to all your friends.
  31. The origin story is so nuts there's going to be a movie or several movies about the early days of Bitcoin. Satoshi Nakamoto remains anonymous to this day. Imagine if the inventor of the cell phone was anonymous.
  32. If you have money to burn, don't buy soda, weed, or some girls private snapchat it's a dead end put it towards Bitcoin and give it to your child in the future.
  33. To avoid getting ripped off by foreign exchange fees just because you were born one place and your friends were born in another place.
  34. Can't live off the grid in your log cabin and still use Mastercard. Bitcoin is one piece of opting out.
  35. If one country adopts BTC as the national currency, it doesn't take much thought to realise that others will follow.
  36. Join a welcoming and unique community. Everyone is super nice because they want your money.
  37. You can stick it to the baby boomers.
  38. You can stick it to the vegans.
  39. You can stick it Roger Ver.
  40. Maybe your IQ is 70 and you'll do whatever CNBC Fast Money recommends.
  41. Maybe a hacker infects your computer, records you doing that thing, and threatens to release the tape if you do not pay them 1.5 Bitcoin.
  42. You're a risk taker looking for some risky investment.
  43. Aliens attack like Independence Day, blow up major cities in major countries, your money is still safe with Bitcoin. As long as there is a some guy, some person, living on an island with a copy of the ledger out there on your'e good. We're all good.
  44. Many proposals to scale the number of transactions, may the best plan win.
  45. One day you might have to use BTC to pay taxes, buy food, and charge your Tesla.
  46. You want to support a political group and remain private.
  47. You can trust math more than you can trust people to set an emission rate.
  48. Government don't know how much you have.
  49. The first response to Bitcoin being published by Hal Finney stated that Bitcoin was positioned to reach million dollar valuation. Hal was the first bull and passed away in 2014, missing a lot #doitforHal.
  50. Baddies can't freeze your money if they mad at you.
  51. The Big Bang Theory mentioned it, maybe you want to be like Sheldon the bazinga guy.
  52. Mid-life crisis.
  53. Be contrarian. In a world where everyone zigs it's sometimes good to zag.
  54. Don't have any hobbies, and you just need a reason to get up in the morning.
  55. Enjoy learning? Bitcoin is a topic where there is so much to learn, and so much development, that it really becomes a never ending journey. For someone who likes learning, it's more productive than speedrunning a video game.
  56. Yolo. You only live once. This isn't a dress rehearsal, if there's something your kind of interested in pursue it. That's true for anything not just Bitcoin. But if you're reading this I'm assuming you're interested.
  57. Bitcoin is not a ponzi scheme. The difference is Bitcoin does not need new people buying in to work, blocks being added will continue even if the community stopped growing.
  58. With religion on the decline maybe you want to join a cult. Crypto twitter is a great echo chamber to meet like minded people.
  59. Satoshi Nakamoto found a way to distribute a global currency in a fair way with the ability to adjust the mining difficulty as we go, it's really incredible. You still need computers and electricity to mine new bitcoin today but it's an extremely fair way for people to earn. There was no premine of Bitcoin. Everyone who has Bitcoin either bought it at what the market said, or they earned it.
  60. No CEO in charge of Bitcoin to make bad decisions or a board of directors that can make changes. The users, an ever growing number, are in charge.
  61. Bitcoin has no days off, it has no workers in charge who can get sick or take a holiday.
  62. Bitcoin has survived 10 years (and more). While there will always be dangers, I'd argue that those first few years it was most vulnerable to fail.
  63. Have some trust in the cypherpunks. Anyone who held and didn't sell bitcoin as it went from pennies to five figures is not looking to get rich. They want to change the world.
  64. Potential president Tulsi Gabbard disclosed owning some.
  65. Digital money is the future, anyone who has tried Venmo can see that. Well Bitcoin is a digitally native asset.
  66. Refugees can use Bitcoin to store their wealth as they flee a failing country.
  67. Bitcoin is an open source project. Anthony Pompliano likes to call it a virus but I like how the author of the Bitcoin Standard describes it. Bitcoin is like a song. As long as one person remembers it you can't destroy a song.
  68. Triple entry accounting. When humans first started recording who owes who what we had single-entry accounting. The king's little brother would keep everything written down, but we had to really trust this guy because he could simply erase a line and that money would be gone. When double-entry accounting started to spread 500 years ago it brought with it massive innovation. Businesses could now form relationships across the ocean as they each kept a record. We did not have innovation again until Satoshi's Bitcoin, where blockchain can be used as the neutral third party to keep record. It might not sound important but blockchain allows us to agree upon an objective reality.
  69. Bitcoin is non-political.
  70. Bitcoin is easy to accept. I mean kind of. It's certainly easier than setting up a bank account.
  71. A sandwich used to cost 10 cents in America, I walk into Subway and they don't even have $5 foot longs anymore. Inflation man..
  72. It's a peaceful protest.
  73. Critics say that mining wastes electricity, but if Bitcoin adoption continues the world will actually be incentivized to produce more renewable energy. There are so many waterfalls and sources of energy in the middle of nowhere right now. People might not see a reason to build a power plant over there now, but in the future it can make business sense. Take that waterfall mine bitcoin, and sell them to the people who can't mine. It allows for a business to sell their energy anywhere.
  74. Get into debates around Bitcoin, build those critical thinking skills.
  75. “Predicting rain doesn't count, building arks does”
  76. “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago, the second best time is now.”
  77. "I never considered for one second having anything to do with it. I detested it the moment it was raised. It’s just disgusting. Bitcoin is noxious poison.”
  78. The immaculate conception. No cryptocurrency can have a start the grassroots way Bitcoin did, it's just impossible given how the space has changed.
  79. There are more than 1000x more U.S. dollars today than there were a hundred years ago.
  80. Bitcoin is the largest transfer of wealth this decade from the least curious to the curious.
  81. The concept of the Star Wars Cantina, Galt's Gulch, or young Beat Generation kids sitting in a basement smoking cigarettes and questioning the world can only exist if money remains fungible.
  82. You can send money to your Dad even if he lives in a country run by bad boys.
  83. Memorize your key, and walk around the world carrying your money in your head.
  84. Free speech.
  85. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9JGmA5_unYGmA5_unY
  86. The Federal Reserve is objectively way too powerful.
  87. John Mcafe promised that if bitcoins were not valued at 1 million dollars by the end of 2020 he would eat his own penis on national television. It will be a sad day if we don't hit that 1 million.
  88. The Apple credit card.
  89. If we ever get artificial intelligence it'll be able to interact with Bitcoin.
  90. Katy Perry is aware of crypto so if by some chance you run into her, you get one chance to strike up conversation, so here's your chance to shine. You don't ask for a picture, you don't say she's pretty, or name your favorite song. Take your shot and ask about what type of cold storage she uses for her bitcoin.
  91. Many people are afraid of a world currency because it's associated with a centralized world power taking control. Bitcoin allows for neutral world money.
  92. Stick it to Mark Zuckerberg.
  93. Developers developers developers developers developer developers.
  94. About 85% of the supply has already been mined.
  95. Bitcoin can always improve. As long as the proposal is really good the code can be upgraded, and if the baddies invent ways to hurt the chain we can just fork off it's just code.
  96. Memes
  97. Name recognition and momentum above all other cryptocurrencies.
  98. 3% discount with Bitcoin at Crescent Tide Cremation Services. Nice cant wait to die.
  99. Like having a swiss bank account in your pocket.
  100. Blow up the banks (in minecraft).
submitted by Th3M0rn1ng5h0w to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

51% attacks are morally justifiable

In this short post I want to set out my case for the moral justifiability of 51% attacks against proof of work cryptocurrencies. In the past, a 51% attack was a theoretical construct that most people didn´t seem to think would be practically achievable or lucrative. This has now changed, as hashpower can be rented on sites like Nicehash and Mining Rig Rentals for a few hours at a time. The attack delivers the attacker two prominent opportunities:
-You can orphan blocks of ¨legitimate¨ miners. This essentially means that whatever work was produced by legitimate miners during your attack became worthless. Mine a secret chain of two hours worth of blocks, release it and you orphaned 2 hours worth of blocks by your competitors. By the time most of the miners have noticed their blocks were orphaned in an attack, their nodes will have been automatically mining on your own chain for a while and it will be too late for them to do anything about it. The amount of money they lost would be equivalent to the amount you had to spend to produce your chain. Because mining is an industry with tight margins, the economic impact on these miners can be very big. The cost may be sufficient in case of a very long attack, to persuade them to quit their endeavor and get a real job.
-The more important opportunity is that you´re able to double spend your coins. This is potentially, incredibly lucrative. How lucrative it is tends to depend primarily on the inflation rate of a cryptocurrency. A low inflation rate means relatively little ¨work¨ is done to maintain the security of the system. A high inflation rate on the other hand, turns the cryptocurrency into a very poor long-term investment. As a consequence, most cryptocurrencies face declining inflation rates, that delay the problem of their ultimately unsustainability into the future. The bank of international settlements explains this issue here.
When it comes to the moral justification of a 51% attack, we first have to ask ourselves why proof of work is morally unjustifiable. There are two main reasons for this:
-Proof of work has an enormous environmental impact, that ensures future generations will have to deal with the dramatic consequences of climate change. There is no proper justification for this environmental impact, as it delivers no clear benefits over existing payment systems other than the ability to carry out morally unjustifiable actions like blackmail.
-Proof of work is fundamentally unsustainable, because of the economic burden it places on participants in cryptocurrency schemes. Cryptocurrencies can´t produce wealth out of thin air. The people who get rich from a cryptocurrency becomes rich, due to the fact that other people step in later. In this sense we´re dealing with a pyramid scheme, but the difference from regular pyramid schemes lies in the fact that huge sums of wealth are not merely redistributed, but destroyed, to sustain the scheme. The cost of the work to sustain the scheme is bigger than you might expect, because the reality is that relatively little money has entered bitcoin. JP Morgan claims that for the crypto assets at large, a fiat amplifier of 117.5 is present, as a purported $2 billion in net inflow pushed Bitcoin’s market capitalization from $15 billion to $250 billion. You have to consider that the Digiconomist estimates that $2.6 billion dollar leaves the Bitcoin scheme on an annual basis, in the form of mining costs to sustain Bitcoin. The vast majority of retail customers who entered this scheme ended up losing money from it. In some cases this lead to suicides.
The fact that proof of work is morally unjustifiable doesn´t directly lead to a moral justification for a 51% attack. After all a sane society would use government intervention to eliminate the decentralized ponzi schemes that are cryptocurrencies. There are a few things that need to be considered however:
-Governments have so far failed in their responsibility to address the cryptocurrency schemes. Instead you tend to see officials insist that proof of work might suck and most cryptocurrency is a scam, but ¨blockchain technology¨ will somehow change the world for the better. Most libertarians who saw these schemes emerge insisted that it´s stupid to participate in them because the government would eventually ban them and round up the people who participated in them. This didn´t happen because of the logistical difficulty of suppressing these schemes (anyone with an internet connection can set one up) as well as the fact that suppressing them would lend credence to the anti-government anarcho-capitalist ideology on which these schemes are based. Goverments might say ¨these schemes facilitate crime, ruin the environment and redistribute wealth from naive individuals to scammers¨, but anarcho-capitalists would insist that governments have grown so tyrannical that they want to ban you from exchanging numbers on computers.
-Because cryptocurrency is fundamentally an online social arrangement, governments have very limited influence over the phenomenon. Binance seeks to become a stateless organization, not subject to the jurisdiction of any particular government. Just as with regular money laundering and tax evasion that hides in small nations that can earn huge sums of money by facilitating these practises, governments are dependent on the actions of individuals to address these practices. Whistleblowers released the panama papers and the tax evasion by German individuals through Swiss bank accounts. Through such individuals, the phenomenon could be properly addressed. In a similar manner, cryptocurrency schemes will need to be addressed through the actions of individuals who recognize the damage these schemes cause to the fabric of society.
-The very nature of a 51% attack means that it primarily punishes those who set up and facilitate the cryptocurrency scheme in the first place. The miners who pollute our environment to satiate their own greed are bankrupted by the fact that their blocks are orphaned. The exchange operators are bankrupted due to double-spend attacks against the scams that they facilitate. When this happens, the cryptocurrency in question should lose value, which then destroys the incentive to devote huge sums of electricity to it.
Finally, there´s the question of whether 51% attacks are viable as a response to cryptocurrency. There´s the obvious problem you run into, that the biggest and oldest scams are the most difficult to shut down. In addition, cryptocurrencies that fell victim to an attack tend to move towards a checkpoint system. However, there are a few things that need to be considered here:
-51% attacks against small cryptocurrencies might not have a huge impact, but their benefit is nonetheless apparent. Most of the new scams don´t require participants to mine, instead the new schemes generally depend on ¨staking¨. If people had not engage in 51% attacks, the environmental impact would have been even bigger now.
-51% attacks against currencies that implement checkpointing are not impossible, if the checkpoints are decentrally produced. What happens in that case is a chain split, as long as the hostile chain is released at the right time. This would mean that different exchanges may get stuck on different forks, which would still allow people to double spend their cryptocurrency.
-There are other attacks that can be used against proof of work cryptocurrencies. The most important one is the block withholding attack. It´s possible for people who dislike a cryptocurrency to join a pool and to start mining. However, whenever the miner finds a valid solution that would produce a block, he fails to share the solution with the pool. This costs money for the pool operator, but it can be lucrative for the actor if he also operates a competing pool himself. In the best case it leads to miners moving to his pool, which then potentially allows him to execute a 51% attack against the cryptocurrency.
-It´s possible to put up a 51% attack bounty, allowing others to do the work for you. This works as following. You make transaction A : 100 bitcoin to exchange X, for a fee of 0.001 BTC. Once this transaction has been included in a block, you immediately broadcast a conflicting transaction with another node: You´ŕe sending those 100 bitcoin to your own wallet, but you´re also including a 50 bitcoin fee for the miners. The miners now have a strong incentive to disregard the valid chain and to start mining a new chain on an older block that can still include your conflicting transaction. Provided that pool operators are rational economic agents, they should grab the opportunity.
-Selfish mining in combination with a Sybil attack allows someone to eclipse the rest of the network, while controlling less than 51% of the hashrate. Your malicious nodes will simply refuse to propagante blocks of your competitors, thereby giving you more time to release your own block. Selfish mining will always be possible with 33% of the hashrate and as far as I can tell there are no pathways known currently to make the scheme impossible for people with 25% of the hashrate. This potentially makes a 51% attacks lucrative without having to carry out double-spend attacks against exchanges. Although double spending is a form of theft, it´s not clear to me whether a selfish mining attack would get you into legal trouble or not.

Conclusion:

The dreaded 51% attack is a morally justifiable and potentially lucrative solution to the Nakamoto scheme.
submitted by milkversussoy to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

Wealth Formula Episode 188: Ask Buck Part 2 (Transcript part 2)

So all right next question and we're already going pretty late this is a long question, okay this is a very long question or at least my answer is going to be very long because this is from Eric. He says this is a hypothetical question if you could participate actively and/or passively and only three of the following alternative investment types over the next five to seven years which ones and why. Okay so there's a long, there's a laundry list of different things here which I think it's useful to go over. These are all things I think the reason Eric has them is because they have been the subject of podcasts of mine over a period of time. Let me give you my personal opinion on each, it's not again not investor advice right this is not it advice, this is my opinion but I'm gonna go through each one that's on this laundry list and just give you a short little feedback from my opinion okay and then I'll come back and I'll give you my three favorites. So self storage units okay I like self storage. I like self storage because it's resilient to the cycles, the recessionary cycles etc and the issue like anywhere else though is you got to find the right operator. You can also you know you could probably learn to do this. I have not necessarily you know learned to do this but I think it's a good business, you know especially with the demographic changes, the boomers as they retire and they leave their you know big houses and they move somewhere warm like Florida or something like that then they got to put their stuff places and that makes it great or you can raise rents very quickly in these things. You basically nickel dime people up you know significantly every year the challenge is finding where do you invest and so I'll tell you that you know I'm not a big fan of funds. I know there are some funds out there I'm not a big fan of them because I like to know what's in the portfolio and I know for a fact that some of the funds are basically you know just a bunch of properties that no one wanted to take down an individual asset necessarily and so they all kind of got grouped together. I like self storage but the deal has to be just right. It has to be just the right location etc etc okay and by the way I think again and from an inflationary standpoint it's a great, great place to be too but you gotta find the right deal. I'm sure we'll get hopefully we'll get one this year in Investor Club. Mobile home parks. Mobile home parks now this should be a good place for hedging the economy because of low-income housing right because of the low income housing play right there's always gonna be people who need it. The problem is okay let me back up there are people who own mobile home parks who are doing really well and if you want to get it in into that I mean hey more power to you I mean there's people who are doing well and and they're making decent money but always just look it as a pure cash flow play okay and if you buy it on your own you may get who knows fifteen twenty percent cash on cash and you know you get a you're gonna know how to run these things. I don't know very much about it. I hear it's not necessarily that hard but you know I mean obviously the professional operators are probably gonna do more with it but you can still make their basically cash counts right now. Here's the problem with investing in them as a limited partner though is that most of funds I see they might be giving you nine ten percent and for me for that kind of low-income housing, I mean this is really like you know Class D stuff right, I mean this is below apartment buildings so nine ten percent is just not enough right and the reason why that you're only getting you know eight nine ten percent is because well I mean the operators are taking the other half usually. If you can learn to buy these on your own then it might be worth it but the reality is that in a fund model or a syndicated model there isn't gonna be a lot of upside there, right? I mean think about it. What do we do in the apartment space? We have the ability to raise rents quite a bit and improve these properties. You can even take a property that has you know currently has residents who are you know C plus residents and all of a sudden you know you've got some hipsters in there and also you've opened up a new completely different kind of asset right? You can do that with apartments but in mobile home parks you really can't do that, you can't do that. I mean seriously like how much can you raise the rent on a mobile home park, you know people are living in mobile home parks if they move up too much then they don't live in mobile home parks anymore so the bottom line is the appreciation on there is gonna be limited. The upside is gonna be limited and that means the annualized return will be limited okay because you're not gonna be able to rely very much on appreciation. It's going to be your cash on cash and think of it that's all. So I'm not a big fan. I'm just not a big fan because if you think about it the next thing on the list here, large multifamily 50-plus units. Well for me this is my number one asset class. I mean people gotta live somewhere and unlike mobile home parks you can get significant IRRs annualized returns by value-add through inflation and gentrification all these things that you really are limited in mobile home parks, you know you can't count on all that with mobile home parks and the reality is for investors if you look in you know Investor Club, our yields are just just as good as but the better than what you're seeing in the funds for mobile home parks and they're much higher quality assets in the right hands. In my opinion is even as a limited partner this continues to be the best place for not only capital preservation and growth capital preservation but also growth in the next five ten years. Okay so small multifamily in other words see you don't want to be a limited partner okay, you want to buy ten, 20 units etc. Well I used to do that more. I don't really do that anymore and I did really well right I mean I did really well with that kind of strategy. If you're a good operator then great go for it. The problem is that okay so say you're buying like a you know a million dollar asset you're gonna put in two hundred, two hundred fifty thousand dollars in that one asset to just buy it. The problem is that the risk profile is significant there if you don't know what you're doing right now as opposed to you know spreading your two hundred, two hundred fifty thousand over four deals in a syndicated deal and getting exposure to you know ten times more doors all of a sudden you've got two million dollars you know you've got two hundred two hundred fifty thousand dollars of equity sitting in one deal and his buck stops with you so if you are comfortable with that by all means I was comfortable with it I didn't necessarily like it and so what I would what I would say is if you're the type of person who really wants to get into the real estate game and be a landlord then go for it otherwise don't. Understand that it's very different to have a ten, twenty unit apartment building than it is a two hundred unit apartment building. One you're a landlord, the other one you're managing a small business so just be aware of that. Single-family homes is the next one on the list and I'll just tell you I just don't like them enough for our, not for our demographic, meaning like accredited investors, because you know you have the ability to do something a lot more scalable right, just through syndications and getting lots and lots of exposures. The thing I don't like about single family homes here's the deal, there's not enough scalability, there's too much Capex, okay so one roof and one furnace each unit and everyone I know who owns five or six single-family homes wishes they didn't own five or six in a single family homes they want to sell them. These get to ten and they're like this is terrible and you know I get a hundred dollars per property and then the next thing you know one month I get a five thousand dollar furnace to replace, so I'm not a big fan. So with multifamily if you're gonna do it on your own I would recommend that an award the way I think that most people who are probably not natural-born landlords should do is its consider syndications. When you get more scale and exposure to more doors, things become more stable, cash flow becomes more stable,there's less risk and in reality what we're seeing in our you know in our limited partnership opportunities is that the returns are you know better than probably most people can do on their own. The next one on the list is agriculture. Agriculture followed by CBD, specialty coffee, chocolate, well so let's start with you know some of these things because I know they've been on my podcast before, and just understand that when I have something on a podcast it does not mean I am advocating for it or saying that you should invest in it or that I even like the deal. All right so let's start with some generalities. Agriculture is fine. The stuff that I see some of the stuff that I'm seeing out there in the podcast ecosystem that you're mentioning concerns me okay and one of them is that I don't like foreign investments very much. I've had some experience with them I've realized the implications of those and I won't do them again, certainly with a smaller operator and the reason for that is that if things go wrong there you have very little recourse okay, yeah very little recourse and it's very difficult you know you have to know your operator very well. You have to trust them because if something happens overseas good luck trying to you know get any sort of retribution, ain't gonna happen right so be very careful with that, I know people get excited about it you know they go on some sort of you know they go on some sort of like investment trip and they come back and you know they're excited, they heard about something like this and it's shiny and bright and stuff like that well why what's the point, I just you know the best place to invest is right here in the US okay. The other thing is agriculture in general I would say it's fine, it's gonna be low yield and also I will say that when there's some thing like it doesn't grow three years and won't yield any cash flow for that period of time what seriously you're okay with that? Okay I'm not. And then on top of that when you sign the contract on these things look at the fine print. Look at what your exit is because you should never invest in anything unless you've thoroughly thought about how you're going to get out of it and some of these things have that problem as well. I'm not a big fan personally. Okay now CBD and I've seen that come up in the ecosystems a lot lately I again I CBD again that space is full of charlatans I would just be careful you know I see stuff people like yeah we're gonna go do this in California right well listen I live in California okay and let me tell you right now everybody I know around here knows this to be true. There is a glut of pot in California you know and apart from a selective highly skilled business people who are in the space, everyone else is gonna get killed, they just are there's this is like you know the horse has already left on this one right. People think I'm gonna do CBD in California guess what there's a few people have thought about this before you and if you're coming into this space and you have no previous experience in you know pot in CBD and all this stuff you're gonna be you're way behind. Okay and the last thing is that unless you are a major player like you got serious pockets behind you I would stay away from this because there is there is like so many laws and so many things to dodge in the space. All I can tell you is I have yet to see you know personally you know from anything that I've been you know sent that's in the US in California anything like that I would be comfortable investing in. Okay now I know there's you know startups and things like that and if you want to spend a little bit of money and those from you know people who know what they're talking about I get it but I would definitely look at that as a fairly high risk thing but for heaven's sake you know just don't listen to a Podcast or you know get an email about hey we're gonna start growing pot in California you want in just please think okay. Let's see the next one I'm going to skip oil and gas because I think I have a question coming up about oil and gas here in a moment. Cryptocurrency again listen it's an asymmetric risk type thing shouldn't be your bread and butter thing at all I mean 5-10 percent max in this bucket of asymmetric risk things that could go I mean the reason I do it is a listen, Bitcoin goes up by you know 10x which I honestly personally think it will you know in the five to 10-year horizon I want to be able to to enjoy that. Now it's not something that I would spend a lot more than that on. Personally I only put money in there that you know keeps me from you know it's the money that I would just spend on things that will you know like a fancy car something like that's what I do. Life settlements okay life settlements just as a reminder what are they? Life settlements are when you buy somebody else's life insurance policies, so maybe somebody's you know 80 years old in real bad health they would like money now they don't have any you know they're not worried about their kids don't need any money anymore so you can buy these policies from them. A lot of times that you know 50 60 cents on the dollar which is a much better deal for them than not getting any money or just you know trying to pull out cash value, it's generally going to be more than the cash value so it's an interesting play. We've talked about this before. We actually have a webinar on it at hedgetheeconomy.com if you're interested. So you're investing life settlements, you know you're basically looking and saying I'm a little worried about the economy and maybe I have a self-directed IRA or solo 401k because you know honestly the other thing is that this is not a tax sheltered type investment so you have to think about that as well, you think to yourself I want to hedge I want a small part of my portfolio something that I feel very comfortable is gonna be there. Well out of all the things that are guarantees in life, death is probably the only one that, people used to say death and taxes but you know I mean the president United States paying taxes has no guarantee in life right I mean death is the only guarantee in life so that it might be worth it, check it out for yourself, hedgetheeconomy.com. Now, notes. Notes it's sort of broad. Notes basically being liens on property for the most part, a lot of times that's what it's indicating. It really depends on the operator you know, I would you know look at it as you know if you look at AHP Servicing you know with Jorge’s company I have looked at this in terms of short-term kind of places to put money for liquidity that I can pull out you know if there's a liquid fund like AHP Servicing for example, but I like appreciation and so that's the problem right, so you might get nine, ten percent cash on cash in notes, you might do a little bit better but you know you're not getting any tax advantages. So with multifamily real estate I mean I can still get nine, ten percent cash on cash and then I get twenty percent plus I are ours typically and you know the nine, ten percent I got is tax deductible so it's really the tax equivalent of making like fifteen percent. So you know fortunately if it's me I do equity over any kind of real estate debt and mostly it's because of the tax advantages. Now if you are gonna do it again, look at your qualified money like IRAs, 401ks etc and you know look at a fund. I also think this is one of those things where you really have to look at the operator. I do like Jorge. He's one of the smartest guys I know so AHP Servicing certainly would be something to consider and I so like liquidity the component of this is a nice place to keep it for a period time. And understand it's not without risk either. This is non-performing paper, but again that's where the operator comes in and you know I think Jorge is a really smart guy so I feel fairly comfortable with that. Gold and silver well honestly I don't see the point as I've said earlier, I mean gold and silver are hedge to inflation so this real estate cash flows and frankly I don't believe in the zombie apocalypse narrative that I have heard before you know where you buy that monster box of silver coins which by the way I did because I drank the kool-aid a few years ago and you know there's this idea that you know you're the only thing that's gonna be able to buy anything is a monster box of silver that's the only thing that people are gonna accept. Well I just don't think that's gonna happen so for me why not buy real estate at least you know you know you can force appreciation etc. Now if you're super paranoid on real estate just you know limit your leverage I'm not saying don't own gold a silver I'm just saying think about it before you go and drink the kool-aid on the you know the fear-based stuff there music royalties and we did have a podcast on that honestly I just don't know much about it but you know some people seem to be doing okay with it I wouldn't make this a core holding unless you were in the business and really know what you're doing. I would put this in your high risk profile. Artwork, similar. Listen I like our work is like gold in my view and if you are an art buff and you really know what you're doing then go for it but I'm not. Some people like vintage cars like me to enjoy it and allow it to appreciate. I think art is similar to that right, so it goes into that pile that I've talked about before where it's like if you have an inch you know if you're one of those people who buys stuff you know nice stuff and you know you want nice stuff well art not fine art and vintage cars are fun but they will appreciate so I think art is similar to that. I know we podcast on fractional ownership apart you don't get the same effect because you know get to keep it in your house but you know you do get to they do keep it in a gallery so that's kind of neat however you know what I'm not a big enough art guy to do this so I'm gonna stick to bread-and-butter stuff instead like real estate, websites, online businesses, if you know what you're doing this can be very profitable. The problem is that most people don't know what they're doing and I have looked into these things a little bit on behalf of people and I've been a little suspicious at least if some of the sites they seem like Ponzi schemes to me but I don't know for sure. Okay but if you know what you're doing with this this is a great space I mean you can make a lot you can make a decent money with this. I've done that private lending well private lending you know as opposed to notes I guess you're just lending to flippers and stuff I mean I would suggest that this is not a bad thing to do if you know how to do it. I know if there's some people who do it pretty fairly prolifically in our group here's what I would suggest though if you're worried about the economy or at all and lending the home flippers is probably one of the riskiest thing you can do but how can you mitigate that risk? Well you may just loan at you know fifty percent loan to value right and in that situation if they can't pay you back at least you've got a property that you can take over at 50 percent of the cost right now. I definitely would not be you know doing super high loan-to-value type notes or private loans and then you know obviously there's some stuff like Lending Club and stuff I have not really you know looked into much, but I think some people have where you can do some of that as well but okay so that's the big list of my favorites. Large scale real estate like apartments and self storage and one that you didn't mention on here that we talked about earlier, Wealth Formula Banking. For me that stocks and bonds that's equity and basically a bond a structure for me right and that makes up 90% of my investments right there and then the rest of its you know shiny stuff, asymmetric risk stuff like Bitcoin gives me exposure to something that could explode and make me a lot of money potentially with a small investment, but if I lose it and won't go crying so you know bottom line is that I mean the the moral of this story is keep it simple. I think one of the things that I noticed that a lot of people are doing because of the podcast ecosystem and I'm somewhat to blame for this because they think you know we do put on different types of things but we've really narrowed that down a lot is that my advice would be that what I have noticed in my own investing success track record over the last 10 years is the stuff that makes money tends to be pretty boring right like real estate I mean at least I've done so many things in the last 10 years and you know the thing that keeps paying me is the stuff that's the most boring. So don't go look out look for shiny objects okay don't look for foreign investments don't look for you know crazy stuff when it comes to your bread-and-butter stuff keep it boring right I mean seriously you know you've got a if you're a limited partner you find a with an operator that keeps delivering why are you looking like for 10 different things. Okay I understand there's a need for some diversity but okay maybe two or three different things and maybe similar types of you know you find good operators you stick with them but you don't need like ten of those I mean it's silly right, just pick a few things and if there's some you know stuff like Bitcoin or something like that really interests you and that's kind of fun for you then you want to buy some you know vintage cars or something like that do that, but stay boring. There's an eloquence about boring that I have experienced in the last decade that I can just say from my experience over time it's not as boring when you get those nice payouts. So anyway we still have a bunch of questions and I've been going for almost an hour so I'm going cut it off and there will be therefore a part 3 Ask Buck. But I do want to thank you and for for having all these questions and we will have part three of Ask Buck next time. Thanks for joining Wealth Formula Podcast. This is Buck Joffrey signing off.
submitted by Buck_Joffrey to u/Buck_Joffrey [link] [comments]

r/Bitcoin recap - August 2019

Hi Bitcoiners!
I’m back with the 32nd monthly Bitcoin news recap.
For those unfamiliar, each day I pick out the most popularelevant/interesting stories in Bitcoin and save them. At the end of the month I release them in one batch, to give you an overview of what happened in bitcoin over the past month.
You can see recaps of the previous months on Bitcoinsnippets.com
A recap of Bitcoin in August 2019
Adoption
Development * Bitcoin Core Developer Andrew Chow is straming his code tests on Twitch (7 Aug)
Security
Mining
Business
Education
Regulation & Politics
Archeology (Financial Incumbents)
Price & Trading
Fun & Other
submitted by SamWouters to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Receiving Money From Friends + Ponzi Websites

Hi There,
I made a post a while ago about my friend who was investing in a site that everyone dubbed as a Ponzi scheme. I didn't get involved, but he's happily still making money out of it and also gone in to another site. He also says he has friends in Interpol who checked it out and said its legit.
The other site is https://awfinancials.org/, a similar deal, except this one pays out 13% every month. He's got money in there, and shown me the accounts, making money every week or day. He's also just bought a 3k TV, apple watch etc, so the money is real and he's doing well with it.
I declined to get involved with those sites because I just dont trust them, but I am astounded he's still making money out of them all these months later - at the rate of compounded interest he's getting he must be well into 60k or so by now.
On top of this, he's also making money by transfering large amounts of money around into Bitcoin, people will contact him, and ask him to transfer the money, and he'll take like 4% or something. He said last thursday he made 4.5k in half hour after some scottish guy contacted him and asked him to transfer like 200k or so. (I forget the actual numbers, sorry if it doesnt work out, I'm just giving examples).
There is also a deal happening that he has gotten a 'facilitator' and a 'principle' together, and they are going to invest a Hydro plant or something over in Asia, and he's going to make over 2m from that deal. Without investing anything.
Does this stuff really happen? Is it all completely illegal? He's going to pay taxes on everything he's made so far, and if he gets this 2m, it will be a lot of taxes. But he could still be left with 1.6m left or something.
After all that he wants to gift me some money, he hasn't said an amount, but i'm imagining its around the region of 100k. If this money is illigitimate, could I get in trouble for receiving it? As far as I know, I trust my friend, and if he want's to gift me money then that's fine.
I don't want responses of 'He's lying' 'He's scamming you'. If you're going to comment, can you assume that he is telling the truth. There may be people lying to him, but he is not lying to me. I am just trying to wrap my head around this all. It is evident that he is making a huge amount of money, thousands, millions perhaps if he receives money from this deal in Asia. He's signed a bunch of contracts and stuff and he's going to find out within a month if it's going to go through or not.
Assume you have a friend who is doing / telling you this stuff and you trust this friend completely, what would be your thoughts?
submitted by chudthirtyseven to UKPersonalFinance [link] [comments]

Fact: Bitcoin Is A Ponzi Scheme Etherium and Bitcoin - Cryptocurency PONZI SCHEME? The 3 Billion Dollar Ponzi Scheme That Crashed Bitcoin Price Bitcoin a Pyramid or Ponzi Scheme? Bitcoin is NOT a Ponzi scheme.  MaiView  20190719

In a Ponzi Scheme, the founders persuade investors that they’ll profit. Bitcoin does not make such a guarantee. There is no central entity, just individuals building an economy. A ponzi scheme is a zero sum game. Early adopters can only profit at the expense of late adopters. Bitcoin has possible win-win outcomes. Early adopters profit from ... It is absurd to label bitcoin a Ponzi scheme. Yet that is what Jim Rickards says. Ironically, Bitcoin is an anti-Ponzi setup, regardless of what it is used for, regardless of whether or not it's ... A ponzi scheme is a fraud in which early investors are lured with massive payouts based on how many people they invite into a business that is designed to cheat people. You may have heard this many times before where certain schemes encourage you to invite 3 other investors promising […] Top Cryptocurrency Ponzi Scams as of 2020 - Real-time cryptocurrency market news including Bitcoin ... The Tax Impact of Ponzi Scheme Investments. Mar 17, 2020 by Jason B. Freeman. Victims of Ponzi schemes run by fraudulent investment brokers may not realize for several years that the brokers are fraudulently reporting earned income. In a typical Ponzi scheme, the broker represents to the investor that these dividends are being reinvested. Thus, victims are likely to report such income (e.g ... "It’s just one big Ponzi scheme," Portnoy told bitcoin and cryptocurrency investor Anthony Pompliano on the popular Pomp Podcast this week. "You get in, and you just have to not be the one left ...

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Fact: Bitcoin Is A Ponzi Scheme

Lachief shall not be liable to the participant for any damages, claims, expenses or losses of any kind (whether direct or indirect) suffered by the participant arising from or in connection with ... This video breaks down why bitcoin is a ponzi scheme, why it's price fluxates, and why $100,000 bitcoin will NEVER happen. If you like my work, please considering donating to my PayPal or becoming ... Lo Schema Ponzi - Economia di Strada di Roberto Gorini - Duration: 4:55. ... Rickards: ‘Bitcoin is a Ponzi Scheme’ - Duration: 7:28. Hedgeye Recommended for you. 7:28. Investire in Ripple - Il ... Bitcoin is NOT a Ponzi scheme. MaiView 20190719 MaiCoin Group. Loading... Unsubscribe from MaiCoin Group? Cancel Unsubscribe. Working... Subscribe Subscribed Unsubscribe 1.17K. Loading ... did this ponzi scheme cause the recent dump? is china's housing bubble bullish for bitcoin? Social Media: Follow me on Dlive: https://dlive.tv/MrSotko Follow...

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